Adaptive Skiing (AWAD)

2014 Photo of Parker Love and Dave Wassil

daveandparker

 

View this link to see Jen, member of the Kipabiskau Water Sport Club trying Adapted Water Skiing for the first time, May, 2013, in Florida.

Learning to Water Ski

Adapted is simply water skiing for athletes with a disability. Participants compete in men and women divisions for blind persons, multiplegics and leg and arm amputees. Adapted tournaments include the same events as water skiing – slalom, tricks and jump. Audio slalom has recently been added to the events list.

Audio Slalom was designed for blind or vision impaired athletes, it is an event similar to slalom. The difference is that the skier turns at the sound of a tone rather than turning around a buoy. The Audio Slalom Signal Generator (ASSG) produces the tone. The ASSG measures the angle of the rope in relation to the boat path and sounds a tone when the skier has pulled far enough to the outside to simulate a turn around a buoy.

Blind athletes use the same equipment as non-disabled athletes, except another water skier is beside them to serve as a guide. Multiplegic athletes use sit skis, where they are seated on a ski that is wider than that of a regular slalom ski. Leg and arm amputees use the same equipment as in water skiing and have the option of skiing with or without a prosthesis.

The categories are as follows:

• A Arm amputees

• L Leg amputees without prosthesis

• LP Leg amputees with prosthesis

• A/L Significant arm and leg impairment, arm and leg amputation, hemiplegia, cerebral palsy and other disabilities/conditions where skiers are able to ski upright for slalom.

• M Quadriplegic, paraplegic and double leg amputees

• M1 Athletes unable to utilize the majority of their trunk musculature and rise from their knees without arm support. They lack full use of their upper extremities. Typically, they do not have adequate grip strength and may utilize their forearms or wrists to hold the handle. This division is comprised mostly of quadriplegics.

• M2 Athletes able to use their upper trunk muscles and raise their body partially from their knees in the skiing position. Typically, they have full use of their upper extremities. This division is comprised mostly of paraplegics, with breaks above T-10 that have poor balance.

• M3 Athletes with good use of the majority of their trunk muscles, possibly including abdominals. Typically, they are able to raise their trunk from their knees in the skiing position and have full use of their upper extremities. This division is comprised mainly of double leg amputees and paraplegics with complete breaks lower than T-12.

• V Blind and vision Impaired

• V1 No light perception at all in either eye, up to light perception but inability to recognize the shape of a hand at any distance or in any direction. V1 skiers are required to ski wearing “black out” goggles.

• V2 From ability to recognize the shape of a hand up to a visual acuity of 2/60 and/or a visual field of less than five degrees.

• V3 From a visual acuity of 2/60 up to a visual acuity of 6/60 and/or a visual field of more than 5 degrees and less than 20 degrees. Skiers classified as V2 and V3 will always ski in one single category named V2/3.